J Cancer 2020; 11(18):5293-5308. doi:10.7150/jca.42816

Review

The new horizon of liquid biopsy in sarcoma: the potential utility of circulating tumor nucleic acids

Junqiang Wei1,2,3, Xinyue Liu1,2, Ting Li1,2, Peipei Xing1,2, Chao Zhang1,2, Jilong Yang1,2✉

1. Department of bone and soft tissue tumor, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin, 300060, China
2. National Clinical Research Center for Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin's Clinical Research Center for Cancer, Tianjin's Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin, 300060, China.
3. Department of Orthopedics, Affiliated Hospital of Chengde Medical College, Chengde, Hebei, 067000, China

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Citation:
Wei J, Liu X, Li T, Xing P, Zhang C, Yang J. The new horizon of liquid biopsy in sarcoma: the potential utility of circulating tumor nucleic acids. J Cancer 2020; 11(18):5293-5308. doi:10.7150/jca.42816. Available from https://www.jcancer.org/v11p5293.htm

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Abstract

The diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of sarcoma are mainly dependent on tissue biopsy, which is limited in its ability to provide a panoramic view into the dynamics of tumor progression. In addition, effective biomarkers to monitor the progression and therapeutic response of sarcoma are lacking. Liquid biopsy, a recent technological breakthrough, has gained great attention in the last few decades. Nucleic acids (such as DNA, mRNAs, microRNAs, and long non-coding RNAs) that are released from tumors circulate in the blood of cancer patients and can be evaluated through liquid biopsy. Circulating tumor nucleic acids reflect the intertumoral and intratumoral heterogeneity, and thus liquid biopsy provides a noninvasive strategy to examine these molecules compared with traditional tissue biopsy. Over the past decade, a great deal of information on the potential utilization of circulating tumor nucleic acids in sarcoma screening, prognosis and therapy efficacy monitoring has emerged. Several specific gene mutations in sarcoma can be detected in peripheral blood samples from patients and can be found in circulating tumor DNA to monitor sarcoma. In addition, circulating tumor non-coding RNA may also be a promising biomarker in sarcoma. In this review, we discuss the clinical application of circulating tumor nucleic acids as blood-borne biomarkers in sarcoma.

Keywords: sarcoma, liquid biopsy, circulating tumor nucleic acids, bloodborne biomarkers