J Cancer 2019; 10(12):2604-2618. doi:10.7150/jca.29611

Review

Biologic Mechanisms Linked to Prognosis in Ovarian Cancer that May Be Affected by Aging

Hye Sook Chon1,5, Marina Sehovic2,3, Douglas Marchion4, Christine Walko3, Yin Xiong4, Martine Extermann2,3,5✉

1. Department of Gynecology Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa FL, USA
2. Senior Adult Oncology Program, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa FL, USA
3. Department of Individualized Cancer Management, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa FL, USA
4. Department of Pathology, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa FL, USA
5. University of South Florida, Tampa FL, USA

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Citation:
Chon HS, Sehovic M, Marchion D, Walko C, Xiong Y, Extermann M. Biologic Mechanisms Linked to Prognosis in Ovarian Cancer that May Be Affected by Aging. J Cancer 2019; 10(12):2604-2618. doi:10.7150/jca.29611. Available from http://www.jcancer.org/v10p2604.htm

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Abstract

The increase of both life expectancy of the Western industrialized population and cancer incidence with aging is expected to result in a rapid expansion of the elderly cancer population, including patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Although the survival of patients with EOC has generally improved over the past three decades, this progress has yet to provide benefits for elderly patients. Compared with young age, advanced age has been reported as an adverse prognostic factor influencing EOC. However, contradicting results have been obtained, and the mechanisms underlying this observation are poorly defined. Few papers have been published on the underlying biological mechanisms that might explain this prognosis trend. We provide an extensive review of mechanisms that have been linked to EOC prognosis and/or aging in the published literature and might underlie this relationship in humans.

Keywords: ovarian cancer, aging, inflammation, immunoscenescence, prognosis, biology of aging and cancer