J Cancer 2017; 8(17):3607-3614. doi:10.7150/jca.21200

Meeting Report

Scientific Summary from the Morgan Welch MD Anderson Cancer Center Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) Program 10th Anniversary Conference

Wendy A. Woodward1, 2✉, Massimo Cristofanilli3, 4, 5, Sofia D. Merajver6, 7, 8, 9, Steven Van Laere10, Lajos Pusztai11, Francois Bertucci12, Fedor Berditchevski13, Kornelia Polyak14, 15, 16, 17, 18, Beth Overmoyer14, Gayathri R. Devi19, 20, Esta Sterneck21, Robert Schneider22, 23, Bisrat G. Debeb1, 24, Xiaoping Wang1, 24, Kenneth L. van Golen25, Randa El-Zein26, 27, Omar M. Rahal1, 2, Angela Alexander1, 24, James M. Reuben1, 28, Savitri Krishnamurthy1, 29, Anthony Lucci1, 30, Naoto T. Ueno1, 24

1. MD Anderson Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Program and Clinic, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX;
2. Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX;
3. Developmental Therapeutics Program of Division of Hematology Oncology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA;
4. Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA;
5. Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA;
6. Program in Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI;
7. Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI;
8. University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA. The Office for Health Equity and Inclusion, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI;
9. Program in Cancer Biology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI;
10. Center for Oncological Research (CORE), Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp Belgium;
11. Breast Medical Oncology, Yale Cancer Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT;
12. Department of Medical Oncology, Institute Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille, France;
13. School of Cancer Sciences of the University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom;
14. Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA;
15. Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA;
16. Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA;
17. BBS Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA;
18. Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA;
19. Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Sciences, Duke University Medical Sciences, Durham, NC;
20. Women's Cancer Program, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC;
21. Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD;
22. Department of Microbiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY;
23. Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY;
24. Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX;
25. Department of Biological Sciences and The Center for Translational Cancer Research, The University of Delaware, Newark, DE;
26. Department of Radiology, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX;
27. Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX;
28. Department of Hematopathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX;
29. Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX;
30. Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX.

Abstract

In 2006, a remarkable collaboration between University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center clinicians and Texas and New Mexico State legislators led to the formation of a dedicated IBC Research Program and Clinic at MD Anderson. This initiative provided funding and infrastructure to foster coordination of an IBC World Consortium of national and international experts, and launch the first ever IBC international conference in 2008, which brought together experts from around the world to facilitate collaborations and accelerate progress. Indeed great progress has been made since then. National and international experts in IBC convened at the 10th Anniversary Conference of the MD Anderson IBC Clinic and Research Program and presented the most extensive sequencing analysis to date comparing IBC to non-IBC, gene- and protein-based immunoprofiling of IBC versus non-IBC patients, and converging lines of evidence on the specific role of the microenvironment in IBC. Novel models, unique metabolic mechanisms, and prominent survival pathways have been identified and were presented. Multiple clinical trials based on the work of the last decade are in progress or in development. The important challenges ahead were discussed. This progress and a coordinated summary of these works are presented herein.

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How to cite this article:
Woodward WA, Cristofanilli M, Merajver SD, Van Laere S, Pusztai L, Bertucci F, Berditchevski F, Polyak K, Overmoyer B, Devi GR, Sterneck E, Schneider R, Debeb BG, Wang X, van Golen KL, El-Zein R, Rahal OM, Alexander A, Reuben JM, Krishnamurthy S, Lucci A, Ueno NT. Scientific Summary from the Morgan Welch MD Anderson Cancer Center Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) Program 10th Anniversary Conference. J Cancer 2017; 8(17):3607-3614. doi:10.7150/jca.21200. Available from http://www.jcancer.org/v08p3607.htm