J Cancer 2014; 5(8):689-695. doi:10.7150/jca.9569

Research Paper

The Modified Glasgow Prognostic Score Is an Independent Prognostic Factor in Patients with Inoperable Thoracic Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Undergoing Chemoradiotherapy

Peng Zhang1*, Mian Xi1*, Qiao-Qiao Li1, Li-Ru He1, Shi-Liang Liu1, Lei Zhao1, Jing-Xian Shen2, Meng-Zhong Liu1✉

1. Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center; State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine; Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, People's Republic of China
2. Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center; State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine; Imaging Diagnosis and Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, People's Republic of China
*These authors contributed equally to this work.

Abstract

Background and purpose: There is increasing evidence that the presence of an inflammation-based prognostic score (modified Glasgow prognostic score, mGPS) is associated with survival in patients with advanced cancer. This study aimed to assess whether the mGPS has prognostic value in patients with thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma undergoing chemoradiotherapy.

Materials and methods: A total of 212 patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy for newly-diagnosed esophageal squamous cell carcinoma between October, 2006 and December, 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin were measured before initiation of treatment. The relationships between the mGPS and other relevant variables including white blood cell count, neutrophilic granulocyte count, platelet count, hemoglobin, bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were analyzed. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were calculated. Significant prognostic factors were identified using univariate and multivariate analyses.

Results: Three-year OS for all patients was 24.6%; 3-year PFS was 21.3%. Patients with a mGPS of 0, 1 and 2 were 90, 78, 44, respectively. Higher mGPS was related to higher white blood cell, neutrophilic granulocyte and platelet counts, and lower total bilirubin. T stage, M stage and mGPS were independent prognostic indicators for OS; T stage, M stage, mGPS and platelet count were independent prognostic indicators for PFS.

Conclusions: Pretreatment mGPS is an easily measurable significant prognostic factor and can be used in combination with conventional TNM staging to predict survival in patients with squamous cell carcinoma undergoing chemoradiotherapy.

Keywords: esophageal cancer, chemoradiotherapy, mGPS, prognostic factor, survival.

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How to cite this article:
Zhang P, Xi M, Li QQ, He LR, Liu SL, Zhao L, Shen JX, Liu MZ. The Modified Glasgow Prognostic Score Is an Independent Prognostic Factor in Patients with Inoperable Thoracic Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Undergoing Chemoradiotherapy. J Cancer 2014; 5(8):689-695. doi:10.7150/jca.9569. Available from http://www.jcancer.org/v05p0689.htm